Karnataka State Board Class 11

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  • Written by Hrushikesh Vyas
  • Last Modified on 24-01-2023
  • Written by Hrushikesh Vyas
  • Last Modified on 24-01-2023

About Exam

About Exam

Exam Brief

The Karnataka School Examination and Assessment Board (KSEAB) was established in 1964 in the State of Karnataka to provide quality education to the students of Karnataka. This board is responsible for conducting the PUC and SSLC examinations. The examination for Class 11 is conducted by the KSEAB.  The Department of Pre-University Education (DPUE) in Karnataka was established in 1966 and currently has more than 2,770 board test centres. They are responsible for implementing upper secondary education in the state.

The Karnataka PUC board administers the first and second-year pre-university education final examination in March every year. In Karnataka, the Pre-University Course (PUC) is a two-year intermediate course that corresponds to Class 11 and Class 12. They are known as 1st PUC and 2nd PUC in PU Colleges or Junior Colleges. In Karnataka, the Department of Pre-University Education is responsible for the examinations in Classes 11 and 12. The PUC Karnataka board’s Class 11 syllabus represents the board’s attempt to give identical values to students’ cultural and academic progress and well-being.

Notification Alert
Latest Update
  • The Karnataka Governor approves the unification of the Pre-University and SSLC exams into a single board.
  • The Governor signed an amendment to the Karnataka Secondary Education Examination Board (KSEEB) Act 1966, renaming it the Karnataka School Examination and Assessment Board (KSEAB).
  • The tests administered by this board will continue to be conducted independently. However, the primary administration of the Karnataka SSLC exams and the Karnataka PUC exams will be combined.

Exam Summary

Exam Conducted By Department of Pre-University, Karnataka
Exam Name Karnataka Pre-University Certificate Examination (PUC Board)
Date Sheet Name 1st PUC Timetable 2022 Karnataka Board
Timetable Release Date February 2022 (tentatively)
Practical Exam Date February 2022 (tentatively)
Theory Exam Date March 2022 (tentatively)

Official Website Link

https://pue.karnataka.gov.in/

Embibe Notice Board/Notification

Test

Latest Update

On January 27, 2022, KSEAB officials have released the final timetable for the Class 10 examinations 2022 on its official website. The Karnataka SSLC exams 2022 will be conducted from March 28, 2022 to April 11, 2022. 

Exam Pattern

Exam Pattern

Exam pattern details - Scoring pattern (+/- Marking)

The exam pattern for 2021-22 sessions’ exams may be seen on the Karnataka state board’s official website. For convenience, candidates can review the entire exam pattern from the table below.

Mode of Examination Offline Examination
Duration of Exam 3 hours
Types of Questions Very short answer questions (VSA) (1 mark each)
Short answer type questions-I (SA-I) (2 marks each)
Short answer type questions-II (SA-II) (3 marks each)
Long answer type questions(LA)(5 marks each)
Medium of Question Paper English or Kannada for academic subjects
Language paper
English paper
Maximum Marks for Language 100 marks
Maximum Marks for Theory 70 marks
Maximum Marks for the Practicals 30 marks

11th Karnataka State Board: Mathematics Exam Pattern

The examination pattern of 11th Karnataka state board Mathematics subject in detail, such as the total number of questions, duration, and marks is given below.

Examination Duration 3 hours
Theory marks 100 marks
Total number of questions 50
Very short answer (VSA) questions (1 mark each) 10 out of 10
Short answer (SA-1) questions (2 marks each) 10 out of 14
Short answer (SA-2) questions (3 marks each) 10 out of 14
Long answer (LA-1) questions (5 marks each) 6 out of 10
Long answer (LA-2) questions (10 mark= 6+4) 1 out of 2

11th Karnataka State Board: Physics Exam Pattern

The exam pattern of Physics is given below.

Exam Duration 3 hours
Internal marks 30 marks
Theory marks 70 marks
Total number of questions 27 out of 37
Very short answer type questions (1 mark each) 10 out of 10
Short answer type questions (SA-1) (2 marks each) 5 out of 8
Short answer type questions (SA-2) (3 marks each) 5 out of8
Long answer (LA-1) (5 marks each) 2 out of 3
Long answer type (LA-2) (5 marks each) 2 out of 3
Numerical problems (NP) (5 marks each) 3 out of 5

11th Karnataka State Board: Chemistry Exam Pattern

The exam pattern of Chemistry is given below.

Exam duration 3 hours
Internal marks 30 marks
Theory marks 70 marks
Total number of questions 27 out of 36
Very short answer type questions (1 mark each) 10 out of 10
Short answer type questions(SA-1) (2 marks each) 5 out of 8
Short answer type questions (SA-2) (3 marks each) 5 out of 8
Long answer (LA-1) (5 marks each) 4 out of 6
Long answer type (LA-2) (5 marks each) 3 out of 5

11th Karnataka State Board: Biology Exam Pattern

The exam pattern of Biology is as stated below.

Examination duration 3 hours
Internal marks 30 marks
Theory marks 70 marks
Total number of questions 27 out of 35
Very short answer (VSA)questions (1 mark each) 10 out of 10
Short answer (SA-1) questions (2 marks each) 5 out of 8
Short answer (SA-2) questions (3 marks each) 5 out of 8
Long answer (LA-1) questions (5 marks each) 4 out of 6
Long answer (LA-2) questions (5 marks) 3 out of 5

Exam pattern details - Total time

The duration of the exam is 3 hours or 180 minutes.

Exam Calendar

The Karnataka PUE board has released the tentative timetable for Class 11 for the year 2022. The tentative timetable is given in the table below.

Date Sheet Name Ist PUC Timetable 2022 Karnataka Board
Timetable Release Date March 2, 2022
Practical Exam Date January 25 to February 10, 2022
Admit card Release Date February 2022
Theory Exam Dates April 22 to May 11, 2022 (Revised -Draft)

Exam Syllabus

Exam Syllabus

Syllabus for Class 11 Karnataka Board

Important Points on 11th Karnataka State Board Exam Syllabus

Students must understand the exam pattern in order to prepare for the exam effectively. The Karnataka 1st PUC syllabus 2021-22 will help familiarise students with the marking scheme, the number of questions, and the test duration, among other things.

The following is the exam pattern for the 11th Karnataka state board 2021-22.

The language options available are listed below.

Kannada Tamil Malayalam Marathi
Telugu Arabic Sanskrit French
Urdu Hindi Optional Kannada  
  • English is compulsory, apart from that any one language can be chosen by the students.
  • Languages make up two of the six subjects, while the remaining four can be chosen from the list below.
History Economics Logic Geography
Karnataka Music Hindustani Music Business Studies Sociology
Political Science Accountancy Statistics Psychology
Physics Chemistry Mathematics Biology
Geology Electronics Computer Science Education
Home Science Basic Maths    
  • According to the Karnataka PUC syllabus 2021-22, the minimum passing percentage for each paper is 35%.

Physics Syllabus

UNIT-I

Chapter 1: Physical World

Physics: Scope and excitement of Physics – Physics, technology and society – Mention of fundamental forces in nature – Nature of physical laws.

Chapter 2: Units And Measurements

Unit of measurement – System of units – SI units – Fundamental and derived units -Length, mass and time measurements – Accuracy and precision of measuring instruments.

Errors in measurement: Significant figures, Dimensions of physical quantities – Dimensional analysis and its applications: (a) Checking of dimensional consistency of equations and (b) Deducing relation among physical quantities, Numerical Problems.

UNIT-II

Chapter 3: Motion in a Straight Line

Position and frame of reference – Definitions of path length and displacement – Definitions of average speed and average velocity, instantaneous speed and instantaneous velocity & uniform and non-uniform motion – Uniformly accelerated motion.

Position-time graph – Velocity-time graph: to show that area under the velocity time curve is equal to displacement.

Kinematic equations for uniformly accelerated motion: Derivation of v = vo + at,x = vot + ½ at 2 and v2 = vo2 + 2 a x using v-t graph – Relative velocity.

Elementary Concepts Of differentiation and integration for describing motion, Numerical Problems.

Chapter 4: Motion in a Plane

Scalars and vectors – Position And displacement vectors – Equality of vectors – Multiplication of a vector by real number. Addition and subtraction of two vectors: Triangle method and parallelogram method.Unit vector – Resolution of a vector: Rectangular components. Resultant of two concurrent vectors, (Refer example 4.2 of text book). Scalar and vector products of two vectors with examples (Refer Chapter 6 & 7 of text book). Motion in a plane with constant acceleration. Projectile motion: Derivations of equation of path, time of flight, maximum height and horizontal range of a projectile. Page 2 of 19 Uniform circular motion: Derivation of centripetal acceleration, Numerical Problems.

UNIT-III

Chapter 5: Laws of Motion

Aristotle’s fallacy – Newton’s first law of motion: Concept of inertia and force – Concept of momentum – Newton’s second law of motion: Derivation of Newton’s second law of motion and definition of SI unit of force – Impulse, impulsive force and examples – Newton’s third law of motion: Identification of action and reaction pairs with examples in everyday life. Law of conservation of linear momentum: Statement and proof in the case of collision of two bodies. Condition for equilibrium of a particle under the action of concurrent forces, Friction: Static and kinetic friction – Laws of friction – Rolling friction – Methods of reducing friction. Dynamics of uniform circular motion: Derivation of maximum speed of a car moving on banked circular road and discussed in the case of level circular road, Numerical Problems.

UNIT-IV

Chapter 6: Work, Energy And Power

Work: Definition of Work and discussion of various cases – Work done by a constant force and a variable force. Kinetic energy – Work-energy theorem: Statement and proof in the case of rectilinear motion under constant acceleration. Concept of potential energy – Principle of conservation of mechanical energy: Statement and illustration in the case of a freely falling body. Conservative and non-conservative forces with examples. Potential energy of a spring – Mention of expression V(x) = ½ kx2 . Power: Definition and derivation of power  Collisions: Elastic and inelastic collisions – Collisions in one dimension: Derivation of loss of kinetic energy in completely inelastic collisions -Derivation of final velocity of masses undergoing elastic collision – Collisions in two dimensions, Numerical Problems.

UNIT-V

Chapter 7: Systems of Particles and Rotational Motion

Definitions of a rigid body, translatory motion and rotatory motion – Centre of mass of a two-particle system – Mention of expression for position coordinates of centre of mass of (a) n particle system (b) a rigid body and (c) a uniform thin rod. Page 3 of 19 Definition of angular velocity and mention of the relation v = r – Definitions of angular acceleration and moment of a force – torque – Angular momentum of a particle. Equilibrium of rigid body: Mention of conditions for mechanical equilibrium of a rigid body. Definitions of moment of inertia and radius of gyration -Theorems of parallel and perpendicular axes: Statement and explanation – Mention of expressions for moment of inertia of a simple geometrical object. Kinematics of rotational motion about a fixed axis: Mention of equation of rotational motion – Comparison of linear and rotational motion. Principle of conservation of angular momentum: Statement and illustrations, Numerical Problems.

UNIT-VI

Chapter 8: Gravitation

Kepler’s laws of planetary motion: Statement and explanation – Universal law of gravitation: Statement and explanation. Acceleration due to gravity: Derivation of relation between g and G. Variation of acceleration due to gravity with altitude (height) and depth: Derivation of acceleration due gravity at a point (a) above and (b) below, the surface of earth. Gravitational potential energy: Derivation of gravitational potential energy. Escape speed: Definition and derivation of expression for escape speed from the principle of conservation of energy. Earth satellites: Derivation of orbital speed of earth satellite – Geostationary and polar satellites, Numerical Problems.

UNIT-VII

Chapter 9: Mechanical Properties of Solids

Elasticity and plasticity -Elastic behavior of solids -Stress and strain – Hooke’s law – Stress-strain curve – Elastic moduli: Definitions and expressions of Young’s modulus, Bulk modulus and Shear modulus of rigidity. Refer supplementary material of text book:Poisson’s ratio – Elastic energy, Numerical Problems. 

Chapter 10: Mechanical Properties of Fluids  Pressure

Definition – Derivation of pressure at a point inside a liquid – Gauge pressure. Pascal’s law: Statement and its applications (hydraulic lift and hydraulic brakes). Streamline flow: Equation of continuity – Turbulent flow –Critical Speed. Bernoulli’s principle: Statement – Explanation of Bernoulli’s equation – Illustration ofBernoulli’s principle in the case of (a) blood flow and heart attack (b) dynamic lift of a ball and aerofoil. Page 4 of 19 Viscosity: Definition and mention of expression for coefficient of viscosity. Stokes’ law. Reynolds number: Mention of expression – Classification of nature of flow on the basis of Reynolds number. Surface tension: Surface energy and surface tension – Angle of contact – Applications of surface tension ideas to drops, bubbles, capillary rise and action of detergents, Numerical Problems. 

Chapter 11: Thermal Properties of Matter

Temperature and heat – Thermal expansion of solids: linear, area and volume expansion of solids – Thermal expansion of liquids: Anomalous expansion of water – Thermal expansion of gases: Derivation of αV = 1/T for ideal gas. Specific heat capacity: Definition of heat capacity and specific heat capacity – Molar specific heat capacity at constant pressure and at constant volume. Principle of calorimetry – Change of state: melting, fusion, melting point, regelation, boiling point, sublimation point – Latent heat: Latent heat of fusion and vaporisation. Heat transfer: Conduction and thermal conductivity – Convection: Sea breeze and land breeze – Radiation: Newton’s law of cooling. Refer supplementary material of text book:Stefan’s law – Qualitative ideas of black body radiation – Wien’s displacement law – Greenhouse effect, Numerical Problems.

UNIT-VIII

Chapter 12: Thermodynamics

Thermal equilibrium – Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics: Statement and explanation. – Heat, internal energy and work – First law of thermodynamics: Statement and explanation -Isothermal process: Derivation of work-done in isothermal process. Adiabatic process: Mention of the expression PVγ = constant, for adiabatic process. Heat engines: Schematic representation and efficiency. Refrigerators (Heat pumps): Schematic diagram and coefficient of performance. Second law of thermodynamics: Kelvin-Planck Statement And Clausiusstatement – Reversible and irreversible processes.Carnot’s engine: Carnot cycle and efficiency, Numerical Problems.

UNIT-IX

Chapter 13: Kinetic Theory

Equation of state of a perfect gas – Kinetic theory of an ideal gas: Derivation of ̅ – Kinetic interpretation of temperature: Mention of expression for average kinetic energy of a molecule in terms of absolute temperature – Definition of rms speed of gas molecules. Degrees of freedom – Law of equipartition of energy: Statement and application to specific heat capacities of monatomic, diatomic and polyatomic gases -Concept of mean free path, Numerical Problems. Page 5 of 19

UNIT-X

Chapter 14: Oscillations

Periodic and oscillatory motion: Definitions of Period and Frequency – Displacement as a function of time – Periodic functions. Simple harmonic motion: Definition, equation, graphical representation of displacement with time – Phase – Mention of expressions for velocity and acceleration- Force law for simple harmonic motion : Energy in simple harmonic motion: Derivations of kinetic energy, potential energy and total energy. Oscillations due to a spring- Restoring force & force constant -Mention of expression for time period. Simple pendulum: Derivation of expression for time period – Qualitative ideas of damped, forced and free oscillations –Resonance, Numerical Problems. 

Chapter 15: Waves

Wave motion – Longitudinal And transverse waves – Mention of displacement relation in a progressive wave – Amplitude and phase – Wavelength and angular wavenumber – Period, frequency and angular frequency – Speed of traveling wave: Mention of expression for  -Mention of expression for speed of transverse wave on a stretched string √ . Speed of a longitudinal wave(sound): Newton’s formula and Laplace’s correction.Qualitative explanation of principle of superposition of waves. Reflection of waves at rigid and open boundaries. Standing waves and normal modes: Theory, extension to stretched string and air columns -Fundamental mode and harmonics – Theory of beats. Doppler effect: Explanation of the phenomenon -Derivation of apparent frequency in the case of (a) moving source and stationary observer, (b) moving observer and stationary source and (c) both source and observer moving, Numerical Problems.

Chemistry Syllabus

UNIT-I

Some Basic Concepts of Chemistry

General introduction: Importance and scope of chemistry, nature of matter-classification, homogeneous and heterogeneous mixtures – examples, concept of elements, atoms, molecules and compounds. Properties of matter and their measurement: seven basic physical quantities, their SI units and scientific notation (exponential notation). Laws of chemical combination, with suitable examples. Dalton’s atomic theory – postulates. Atomic and molecular masses: Atomic mass, amu (value of 1amu), average atomic mass with an example, molecular mass, examples, formula mass – NaCl as example. Mole concept and molar mass: Avogadro constant, mole and molar mass – examples. Percentage composition, empirical formula and molecular formula- numerical problems. Stoichiometry relations –numerical problems to calculate the amount of reactants/ products formed (in terms of mole and mass in grams) by giving balanced equations, limiting reagent –numerical problems. Reactions in solutions: concentration terms – mass %, mole fraction, molality, molarity. Numerical problems.

UNIT-II

Structure of Atom

Discovery of electrons – name of the discoverer, characteristics of cathode rays, values of charge and mass. Discovery of protons – characteristic of canal rays, values of charge and mass. Discovery of neuron – name of the discoverer, value of charge and mass. Atomic number, mass number, isotopes, isobars, problems. Atomic models: Thomson atomic model and its limitations. Mention the observations and conclusions of – ray scattering experiment. Rutherford atomic model and its limitations(based on Maxwell electromagnetic theory). Electromagnetic radiations their relationships, electromagnetic spectrum, particle nature of EMR, line spectrum of hydrogen, formula to calculate spectral lines in hydrogen – numerical problems. Bohr’s model-postulates and its limitations, concept of shells and subshells, dual nature of matter and light, de-Broglie relationship – numerical problems. Heisenberg uncertainty principle and its mathematical form. Concept of orbitals ,meaning of and 2 , nodal surfaces or nodes. Quantum numbers, shapes of s, p, d orbitals, rules for filling electrons in orbitals- (n + l) rule, Aufbau principle, Pauli exclusion principle, Hund’s rule. Electronic configuration of atoms (1 to 36). Stability of half filled and completely filled orbitals.

UNIT-III

Classification of Elements and Periodicity in Properties 

Significance of classification, brief history of development of periodic table – law of triads with an example, law of octaves, Mendeleev periodic law – statement, Henry moseley observation based on X- ray spectra of elements, modern periodic law, long form of 2 periodic table. Brief account of groups, periods, s, p, d and f blocks, Nomenclature of elements with atomic number greater than 100. Periodic trends in properties of elements with reason: atomic radii, inert gas radii, ionic radii. compare radius of cation and anion with parent atom ,with reason, variation of radii of isoelectronic species, ionisation enthalpy, exception in first ionization enthalpy of N and O, with reason, electron gain enthalpy, compare egH of F and Cl with reason. Electronegativity. valence – periodicity of valence or oxidation states (s and p block elements).

UNIT-IV

Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 

Chemical bond, valence electrons, Octet rule, Lewis symbols – significance, types of chemical bonds, Ionic bond (electrovalent bond) , example NaCl, Covalent bond- example Cl2 (single bond formation), CO2 (double bond formation), acetylene (triple bond formation), Lewis representation of some simple molecules (H2, O2, CO3- as examples), formal charge – definition , calculation of formal charge on each oxygen atom in ozone, limitation of octet rule – with one example for each. Favourable conditions for the formation of ionic bond . Stability of ionic compound – lattice enthalpy. (details of lattice enthalpy to be dealt in thermodynamics). Bond parameters: Bond length, covalent radius, Van der waals radius , bond angle, bond enthalpy and average bond enthalpy, bond order. Polarity of bonds- polar nature of covalent bond, dipole moment ,polarity in H2O, BF3, BeF2, comparison of NH3 and NF3, Fajan’s rule. Geometry of molecules – VSEPR theory – postulates , shapes of molecules containing lone pair/s and bond pair/s, examples- BeCl2, CH4, H2O, NH3, SO2. Resonance: concept, example- ozone. VBT: orbital overlap concept – s-s, s-p and p-p with examples, and bonds. Hybridisation concept-conditions for hybridization- types of hybridization, discuss sp 3 with CH4, sp 2 with BCl3, sp with C2H2, sp3d with PCl5, sp3d2 with SF6, other examples to be mentioned. MOT: Salient features, formation of molecular orbitals by LCAO method (qualitative approach),conditions for combination of atomic orbitals, formation of and molecular orbitals, energy level diagrams for molecular orbitals for homonuclear diatomic molecules (H2, He2, C2). Electronic configuration and molecular behaviour (bond order, nature of bond, bond length, magnetic nature, stability): H2, He2, Li2, C2, O2. Hydrogen bonding- types of hydrogen bonding, examples.

UNIT-V

States of Matter- Gases and Liquids

Introduction-three states of matter, intermolecular forces- definition, types-dipole-dipole, dipole- induced dipole and London (dispersion) forces- a brief account with examples. Thermal energy- intermolecular forces vs thermal interactions . Gaseous state: characteristics (mention), gas laws: Boyle’s law and Charles’ law – Statements, mathematical forms , graphs (P vs, V ,V vs T). Kelvin temperature scale, absolute zero-concept. Gay Lussac’s Law (P, T relationship) – statement, mathematical 3 form, graph. Avogadro law – Statement, mathematical form, Avogadro constant, STP conditions, molar volume. Ideal gas: definition, ideal gas equation –derivation(from gas laws), gas constant R-value in SI units to be calculated, value of R in Latm K–1mol–1 to be mentioned. Relation between molar mass and density. Dalton’s law of partial pressures – statement, mathematical form , aqueous tension and pressure of dry gas to be mentioned, relation between partial pressure of a gas and its mole fraction. Numerical problems on gas laws and ideal gas equations only. Kinetic molecular theory of gases: assumptions, kinetic energy and molecular speeds (average, most probable, root mean square) – an elementary idea. Behaviour of real gases- deviations from ideal behaviour, graph of PV vs P, causes for deviation and conditions for ideal behavior. van der Waals equation, compressibility factor (Z) – expression and its significance. Boyle temperature or Boyle point. Liquefaction of gases – critical temperature, critical volume, critical pressure- meaning. (isotherms of CO2 are not included) . Liquid state: vapour pressure, normal and standard boiling points. Surface tension and viscosity: definition and SI units (no mathematical derivations)

UNIT-VI

Thermodynamics

Thermodynamic terms – concepts of system, surroundings, types of systems-examples, state of the system, state functions or state variables, energy- a state function, isothermal adiabatic, constant volume(isochoric)and pressure(isobaric) processes, reversible and irreversible processes, extensive and intensive properties. Internal energy: as a state function .work and heat. Change in internal energy due to work and heat. First law of thermodynamics, mathematical form. Expression for U under adiabatic process ( U= w ) and isothermal process ( U = qv). Expressions for work done during isothermal irreversible and reversible change. (derivation not included). Numerical problems. Exothermic and endothermic reactions. Enthalpy: definition, change in enthalpy-sign convention, relationship between H and U,(derivation not included) examples. Numerical problems. Heat capacity, specific heat, relationship between CP and CV for an ideal gas (derivation not included). Measurement of U ( bomb calorimeter) and of H ( calorimeter)-in brief. Thermochemical equations- examples , enthalpy of a reaction – definition- example, factors affecting enthalpy of a reaction, standard state of a substance (specified temperature and 1 bar pressure). Standard enthalpy of a reaction: definition and examples of bond dissociation, phase transition, sublimation, formation, combustion, atomization, solution, dilution, ionization. Lattice enthalpy and Born – Haber cycle for NaCl. Hess’s law of constant heat summation- statement-example. Numerical problems to calculate enthalpy of combustion and enthalpy of formation of CH4, C6H6, CH3OH. Spontaneous and non spontaneous processes, examples, introduction of entropy as a state function, change in entropy of a system during a reversible process S = T qrev , entropy and spontaneity.Second law of thermodynamics,statement,Gibbs energy–definition( G = H–TS), 4 Gibbs equation: G = H T S, G as a criterion for spontaneous and non spontaneous processes. Absolute entropy, third law of thermodynamics. Gibbs energy change and equilibrium, relationship between G 0 and equilibrium constant (criteria for equilibrium), numerical problems.

UNIT-VII

Equilibrium 

Introduction, equilibrium state of a system–equilibrium in physical processes-types examples. Equilibrium involving dissolution of solid or gas in liquid- examples. Equilibrium in chemical processes: meaning (rf = rb), dynamic nature, equilibrium equation (law of mass action). Equilibrium constant (equilibrium law), l 1 K K — (a) , for reverse process, Kp and Kc expressions for aA + bB   cC + dD ( to be assumed), Kp = Kc (RT) n — (b) (to be assumed) , examples for relation between Kp and Kc for reactions, n = 0, n > 0, n < 0 — (c). Numerical problems on (a), (b) and (c) and on KP, KC. (avoid quadratic equation). Homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria- examples. Applications of equilibrium constant – predicting the extent of a reaction, direction of the reaction by reaction quotient Q, predicting the spontaneity of a forward or a reverse reaction based on G of a reversible reaction. Factors affecting equilibrium – Lechatelier’s principle- effect of temperature, concentration, pressure, catalyst, addition of inert gas- in brief. Effect of temperature : 2NO2   N2O4 ; H = ve Effect of concentration: Fe3+ + SCN   Fe(SCN)]2+ , addition of Fe3+ and oxalate ion. Effect of pressure: CO + 3H2   CH4 + H2O. Ionic equilibrium – theories of acids and bases, with examples. Ionisation of acids and bases, degree of dissociation, strong and weak electrolytes, examples. Ionic product of water: definition, expression, value at 298K, pH scale, pH- definition, pKw = pH + pOH(derivation).Numerical problems to calculate [H+ ], [OH ], from ionic product of water, pH, pOH. Ionisation constant of weak acid and weak base: Ka and Kb, pKa and pKb and their relationship with Kw and pKw. Ionisation of polybasic acid with an example. Factors affecting acid strength in brief (bond strength and electronegativity).Numerical problems (direct) on pKa , pKb Common ion effect-definition, examples (CH3COOH + CH3COONa, NH4OH + NH4Cl), Buffer solutions-definition and examples (acetate and ammonia buffers), Henderson – Hesselbalch equation for acidic buffer to be derived, assume equation for basic buffer. Numerical problems. Hydrolysis of salts, pH of their solutions (elementary idea), solubility product, solubility examples, relationship between Ksp and S for AB, AB2, A2B type salts (BaSO4, AgCl, Ag2CrO4, PbI2) and a general expression for AxBy. Numerical problems taking BaSO4, AgCl, Ag2CrO4, PbI2 as examples.Condition for precipitation (Qsp>ksp). Common ion effect on solubility of ionic salts.

UNIT-VIII

Redox reactions 

Concept of oxidation and reduction: classical idea–oxidation (addition of oxygen/ electronegative element or removal of hydrogen/ electropositive element, example for each), reduction – (removal of oxygen/electronegative element or addition of hydrogen/ electropositive element, example for each). Redox reactions: in terms of electron transfer reactions with examples, oxidation & reduction – in terms of loss & gain of electrons, oxidising agent, reducing agent. Oxidation number: definition, rules to calculate oxidation number, examples. Oxidation state, Stock notation – examples – FeO, Fe2O3, CuI, CuO, MnO and MnO2. Oxidation, reduction, oxidizing agent/oxidant, reducing agent/ reductant – in terms of oxidation number- examples. Types of redox reactions: 1. Combination reactions : C(s) + O2 (g) CO2(g) 2. Decomposition reactions : 2KClO3 (s) 2KCl (s) + 3O2(g) 3. Displacement reactions (a) Metal displacement: CuSO4(aq) + Zn (s) Cu(s) + ZnSO4 (aq) b) Non-metal displacement: 2Na(s) + 2H2O(l) 2NaOH(aq) + H2(g) 2H2O (l) + 2F2 (g) 4HF(aq) + O2(g) 4. Disproportionation reactions: 2H2O2 (aq) 2H2O(l) + O2(g) Cl2 (g) + 2 OH (aq) ClO– (aq) + Cl– (aq) + H2O (l) Balancing of redox reactions : a) Oxidation number method: 2 Cr O2 7(aq) + 2 SO3(aq) 3 Cr aq + 2 SO4(aq) (acidic medium) MnO4 – (aq) + Br– (aq) MnO2(s)+BrO3 – (aq)(acidic medium) b) Half reaction method : Fe2+ (aq)+Cr2O7 2– (aq) Fe3+ (aq)+Cr3+ aq) (acidic medium) MnO4 – (aq) + I– (aq) MnO2(s) + I2(s) (basic medium) Applications: redox titrations, redox indicators – with examples. In electrode processes and cells (mention).

UNIT-IX

Hydrogen

Position of hydrogen in periodic table – similarities and differences with respect to alkali metals and halogens, occurrence, isotopes, preparation: laboratory method– Zn with acid, commercial – electrolysis of water, from methane and coal (as water gas). Properties: physical properties, chemical properties – reaction with halogens, dioxygen, dinitrogen, uses. Hydrides – classification- one example for each type. Water – structure of the molecule, structure of ice, amphoteric nature (with NH3, HCl), reaction with Na metal. Hard and soft water-differences, types of hard water-differences. H2O2 – preparation from BaO2, volume strength of H2O2, structure, oxidizing property – with PbS, MnO4 in acidic medium, reducing property – with I2, storage of H2O2, uses. D2O – uses. Dihydrogen as a fuel – meaning of hydrogen economy.

UNIT-X

s–Block Elements  

Group – I, Group – II elements: general introduction, electronic configuration, occurrence, trends in ionization enthalpy, hydration enthalpy, atomic and ionic radii, trend in reactivity with oxygen (air), water, hydrogen , halogen. Uses. Anomalous properties of lithium – reasons. Diagonal relationship with Mg – reasons, similarities in the properties of lithium with magnesium. Preparation and properties of some compounds: Sodium carbonate (washing soda):preparation by Solvay process (procedure and equations), properties-hydrolysis of CO3 – (Na2CO3),uses. Sodium chloride: sources, uses. Sodium hydroxide: commercial process–using Castner – Kellner cell, properties– deliquescent, uses. Sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) – preparation from Na2CO3, uses. Biological importance of sodium and potassium. Anomalous behaviour of Beryllium- reasons, diagonal relationship with aluminium – reasons, similarities in properties of Beryllium with aluminium. CaO: preparation, properties – reaction with water, CO2, uses. CaCO3: occurrence, preparation from slaked lime, uses, preparation of plaster of Paris from gypsum, uses. Biological importance of Ca, Mg.

UNIT-XI

Some p–Block Elements

General introduction to p– block elements-electronic configuration, oxidation states, inert pair effect, anomalous behavior of first member of each group. Group 13 elements: General introduction, electronic configuration, occurrence , variation of atomic radii, ionization enthalpy, electronegativity, physical properties, common oxidation states – considering inert pair effect, trend in chemical reactivity. Reaction of aluminium with air, acid, alkali (NaOH). Anomalous properties of boron. Some important compounds of boron: Borax – reaction with water, action of heat, orthoboric acid – preparation from borax, properties – as a Lewis acid, action of heat, structure, diborane – preparation from BF3 with LiAlH4, physical properties- reaction with air, water, NH3 – formation of inorganic benzene (borazine), structure. Uses of boron and aluminium. Group – 14 elements: general introduction, electronic configuration, occurrence, variation of covalent radii, ionization enthalpy, electronegativity, oxidation states (inert pair effect) and trends in chemical reactivity towards oxygen and water. Carbon: anomalous behaviour- reason, catenation, allotropic forms – graphite, diamond, fullerenes – their characteristics (structures not required). CO – preparation from HCOOH, carbon and air(producer gas), properties- reducing property- with Fe2O3, ZnO, poisonous nature, formation of metal carbonyls,uses. CO2 – preparation from CaCO3 (laboratory method), properties – weak dibasic acid, in photosynthesis, as dry ice,uses. Important compounds of silicon: SiO2 – structure, reaction with NaOH, HF, uses. Silicones –repeating unit ( R2SiO ), structure (partial) of the polymer, uses. Silicates – basic unit – Si4 O4 , examples. zeolites – example, uses.

UNIT-XII

Organic Chemistry – Some basic principles & Techniques 

General introduction, mention urea as first organic compound synthesized by Wohler. Shapes of carbon compounds due to sp3 , sp 2 and sp to be mentioned. Structural representation – complete, condensed, and bond line formulas, wedge formula for CH4. Classification of organic compounds, functional groups, homologous series,IUPAC nomenclature of organic compounds (upto 6 carbons for aliphatic, 9 for aromatic),and bifunctional compounds. Isomerism – structural – chain, position, functional, metamerism. Fundamental concepts in organic reactions:mechanism – definition , fission of covalent bond – homolytic and heterolytic, carbanion, carbocation, alkyl free radicals, examples.Compare the stabilities of 1°, 2°, 3° carbocations and alkyl free radicals. Nucleophiles and electrophiles, examples. Electron movement in organic reactions – Inductive effect – definition, example, electron withdrawing group(EWG,-I), electron donating groups (EDG,+I)-examples, resonance structures – concept to be recalled- resonance-definition, resonance energy, resonance effect, +R, R effects with examples, electromeric effect , (+ E) and ( E) effects with examples, hyperconjugation (no bond resonance), examples –C2H5 ,C H2 5  , CH3CH = CH2 (orbital diagram not required). Methods of purification of organic compounds: principle and examples – sublimation, crystallization, distillation, differential extraction.Chromatography:adsorption (column and TLC)and partition chromatography ( all in brief). Diagrams for simple distillation, column and paper chromatography. Qualitative analysis: detection of carbon and hydrogen, Lassigne’s test: preparation of sodium fusion extract and tests to detect nitrogen, sulphur, halogens, and phosphorus (equations not expected). Quantitative analysis: principle and calculations involved in the estimations of- carbon and hydrogen (labeled diagram), nitrogen by Duma’s and KJeldahl’s method(final equation only), halogens (Cl, Br, I) by carius method, sulphur by carius method and phosphorus. Numerical problems.

UNIT-XIII

Hydrocarbons

Classification of hydrocarbons. Alkanes: nomenclature (upto 5 carbon atoms), isomerism,physical properties. Preparation by: hydrogenation of alkene and alkyne, examples (ethene, propene), from alkylhalide (reduction) and Wurtz reactions( methy and ethyl halides), Kolbe’s electrolytic method for CH3COONa (details of process not required). Chemical properties: substitution reaction – halogenation – chlorination – mechanism, combustion (CH4, C4H10), controlled oxidation (CH4 to CH3OH, H CHO), aromatization (for hexane) pyrolysis. Conformational isomerism: conformations- sawhorse and Newman projection formulae for eclipsed and staggered forms of ethane – compare stability and dihedral angle. Alkenes: nomenclature (upto 5 carbon), structure of double bond (ethene, bond types and number).Geometrical isomerism – explain it as a type of stereoisomerism, cis and trans isomers,example – 2-butene. Physical properties. 8 Preparation: by hydrogenation of 2-butyne– by Lindlar’s catalyst to get cis and Na/NH3 to get trans isomers of 2-butene,dehydrohalogenation of alkyl halide, dehalogenation of vicinal halides- examples taking ethyl bromide and 2-cholopropane,1,2-dibromoethane, dehydration – ethene from alcohol. Properties – chemical properties – addition reactions of ethene with H2, Cl2, Br2 / CCl4 (test for unsaturation). Markovnikoff’s rule, addition of HBr to propene, mechanism, peroxide effect – for propene with HBr, addition of water to ethene and propene, oxidation (Baeyer’s reagent) of ethene, ozonolysis (identification of products for ethene, propene, 2-butene), polymerization, uses. Alkynes: nomenclature (up to 5 carbon), isomerism, structure of triple bond (ethyne-types of bonds and number). Preparation of ethyne – from calcium carbide, 1, 2-dibromoethane. Chemical properties for ethyne: acidic character – reaction with sodium metal, addition reactions with –H2, Br2, HBr, H2O. Polymerization – example for linear polymer, ethyne to benzene. Aromatic hydrocarbons: Introduction, IUPAC nomenclature, isomerism (position–o, p, m), structure of benzene – kekule structures, resonance and stability of benzene, aromaticity – characteristics for aromaticity (Huckel rule) – examples – benzene, cyclopentadienyl anion, naphthalene. Chemical properties of benzene – electrophilic substitution reactions- halogenation, nitration, sulphonation, Friedel-crafts alkylation (R X where R = CH3, C2H5), acylation (CH3COCl, (CH3CO)2O), benzene into hexachlorobenzene, addition reaction with H2, Cl2. Mechanism of electrophilic substitution reaction – chlorination, nitration, alkylation (with CH3Cl) acylation (CH3COCl). Directive influence of a functional group in benzene – ortho and para directing groups ( OH, OCH3, Cl, CH3) and meta directing groups ( NO2, CHO, COOH) with examples. Carcinogenicity and toxicity of benzene and polynuclear hydrocarbons to be mentioned.

UNIT-XIV

Environmental Chemistry

Environmental pollution: Air pollution or troposphere pollution: gaseous air pollutants – oxides of sulphur, nitrogen, carbon, hydrocarbons – source and harmful effects to be mentioned. Global warming and greenhouse effect-brief note, acid rain – causes. Particulate pollutants- smoke, dust, mist and fumes, photochemical smog (composition)-source/formation and health problems-remedy. Stratospheric Pollution: formation and breakdown of ozone (ozone hole), effects of depletion of the ozone layer. (Chemical reactions involved in the formation of smog and ozone depletion to be mentioned). Water pollution: causes- organic wastes, pathogens, BOD and its significance, chemical pollutants and eutrophication. Soil pollution: causes-pesticides, industrial wastes, biodegradable and non-biodegradable wastes. Strategies to control environmental pollution: waste management, collection and disposal. Green chemistry: Introduction, green chemistry in day-to-day life, dry cleaning of clothes, bleaching of paper, synthesis of chemicals.

Mathematics Syllabus:

UNIT-I

Sets and Functions 

  1. Sets and their representations:

 Definitions, examples, Methods of Representation in roster and rule form, examples Types of sets: Empty set. Finite and Infinite sets. Equal sets. Subsets. Subsets of the set of real numbers, especially intervals (with notations). Power set. Universal set. examples Operation on sets: Union and intersection of sets. Difference of sets. Complement of a set, Properties of Complement sets. Simple practical problems on union and intersection of two sets. Venn diagrams: simple problems on Venn diagram representation of operation on sets 

  1. Relations and functions cartesian product of sets: 

Ordered pairs, Cartesian product of sets. Number of elements in the Cartesian product of two finite sets. Cartesian product of the reals with itself (upto R × R × R). Relation: Definition of relation, pictorial diagrams, domain, co-domain and range of a relation and examples Function : Function as a special kind of relation from one set to another. Pictorial representation of a function, domain, co-domain and range of a function. Real valued function of the real variable, domain and range of constant, identity, polynomial rational, modulus, signum and greatest integer functions with their graphs. Algebra of real valued functions: Sum, difference, product and quotients of functions with examples. 

  1. Trigonometric functions angle: 

Positive and negative angles. Measuring angles in radians and in degrees and conversion from one measure to another. Definition of trigonometric functions with the help of unit circle. Truth of the identity sin2 x + cos2 x = 1, for all x. Signs of trigonometric functions and sketches of their graphs. Trigonometric functions of sum and difference of two angles: Deducing the formula for cos(x+y) using unit circle . Expressing sin ( x+ y ) and cos ( x + y ) in terms of sin x, sin y, cos x and cos y . Deducing the identities like following: ( ) , cot (x±y)= Page 1 of 20 Definition of allied angles and obtaining their trigonometric ratios using compound angle formulae. Trigonometric ratios of multiple angles: Identities related to sin2x, cos2x, tan2x, sin3x, cos3x and tan3x Deducing results of sinx +siny = 2 sin cos ; sinx-siny = 2 cos sin cosx +cosy= 2 cos cos ; cosx –cosy = – 2 sin sin and problems. Trigonometric Equations: General solution of trigonometric equations of the type sinθ = sin α, cosθ = cosα and tanθ = tan α. and problems. Proofs and simple applications of sine and cosine rule.

UNIT-II

Algebra

  1. Principle of Mathematical induction process of the proof by induction, motivating the application of the method by looking at natural numbers as the least inductive subset of real numbers. The principle of mathematical induction and simple problems based on summation only. 
  2. Complex numbers and quadratic equations: Need for complex numbers, especially √ , to be motivated by inability to solve every quadratic equation. Brief description of algebraic properties of complex numbers. Argand plane and polar representation of complex numbers and problems Statement of Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, solution of quadratic equations in the complex number system, Square-root of a Complex number given in supplement and problems. 
  3. Linear Inequalities, algebraic solutions of linear inequalities in one variable and their representation on the number line and examples. Graphical solution of linear inequalities in two variables and examples Solution of system of linear inequalities in two variables -graphically and examples
  4. Permutations and combinations, fundamental principle of counting. Factorial n Permutations : Definition, examples , derivation of formulae n Pr, Permutation when all the objects are not distinct , problems. Combinations: Definition, examples Proving nCr =nPr r!, nCr = nCn-r ; nCr + nCr-1 = n+1Cr Problems based on above formulae.
  5. Binomial theorem history, statement and proof of the binomial theorem for positive integral indices. Pascal’s triangle, general and middle term in binomial expansion, Problems based on expansion, finding any term, term independent of x, middle term, coefficient of xr 
  6. Sequence and series: Definitions Arithmetic Progression (A.P.):Definition, examples, general term of AP, nth term of AP, sum to n term of AP, problems. Arithmetic Mean (A.M.) and problems Geometric Progression (G.P.): general term of a G.P., n th term of GP, sum of n terms of a G.P. , and problems. Infinite G.P and its sum, geometric mean (G.M.). Relation between A.M. and G.M. and problems. Sum to n terms of the special series : ∑ n, ∑ n 2 and ∑ n 3


UNIT-III

Coordinate Geometry

  1. Straight lines brief recall of 2-D from earlier classes: mentioning formulae . Slope of a line : Slope of line joining two points , problems Angle between two lines: slopes of parallel and perpendicular lines, collinearity of three points and problems. Various forms of equations of a line: Derivation of equation of lines parallel to axes, point-slope form, slope-intercept form, two-point form, intercepts form and normal form and problems. General equation of a line. Reducing ax+by+c=0 into other forms of equation of straight lines. Equation of family of lines passing through the point of intersection of two lines and Problems. Distance of a point from a line , distance between two parallel lines and problems.
  2. Conic section, sections of a cone: Definition of a conic and definitions of circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola as a conic . Derivation of standard equations of circle , parabola, ellipse and hyperbola and problems based on standard forms only.
  3. Introduction to three-dimensional geometry coordinate axes and coordinate planes in three dimensions. Coordinates of a point. Distance between two points and section formula and problems.


UNIT-IV

Calculus

Limits and derivatives limits: Indeterminate forms, existence of functional value, Meaning of xa, idea of limit, Left hand limit , Right hand limit, Existence of limit, definition of limit, Algebra of limits , Proof of  for positive integers only, and  and problems Derivative: Definition and geometrical meaning of derivative, Mentioning of Rules of differentiation , problems Derivative of xn , sinx, cosx, tanx, constant functions from first principles . problems Mentioning of standard limits  ( ) , 

UNIT-V

Mathematical Reasoning

Definition of proposition and problems, logical connectives, compound propositions, problems, Quantifiers, negation, consequences of implication-contrapositive and converse ,problems , proving a statement by the method of contradiction by giving counter examples.

UNIT-VI

Statistics and Probability 

  1. Statistics measure of dispersion, range, mean deviation, variance and standard deviation of ungrouped/grouped data. Analysis of frequency distributions with equal means but different variances.
  2. Probability random experiments: outcomes, sample spaces (set representation). Events: Occurrence of events, ‘not’, ‘and’ & ‘or’ events, exhaustive events, mutually exclusive events. Axiomatic (set theoretic) probability, connections with the theories of earlier classes. Probability of an event, probability of ‘not’, ‘and’, & ‘or’ events.

Biology Syllabus

Unit Number and Name Topic
UNIT-I
Diversity in the Living World

1: The Living World: Introduction
1.1 What is living?
1.2 Diversity in the living world
1.3 Taxonomic categories
1.3.1 Species
1.3.2 Genus
1.3.3 Family
1.3.4 Order
1.3.5 Class
1.3.6 Phylum
1.3.7 Kingdom
1.4 Taxonomical AIDS
1.4.1 Herbarium
1.4.2 Botanical garden
1.4.3 Museum
1.4.4 Zoological parks
1.4.5 Key

2:Biological Classification
Introduction
2.1 Kingdom monera
2.1.1 Archaebacteria
2.1.2 Eubacteria
2.2 Kingdom protista
2.2.1 Chrysophytes
2.2.2 Dinoflagellates
2.2.3 Euglenoids
2.2.4 Slime moulds
2.2.5 Protozoans
2.3 Kingdom fungi
2.3.1 Phycomycetes
2.3.2 Ascomycetes
2.3.3 Basidiomycetes
2.3.4 Deuteromycetes
2.4 Kingdom plantae
2.5 Kingdom animalia
2.6 Viruses, viroids, prions and lichens

3: Plant Kingdom
Introduction
3.1 Algae
3.1.1 Chlorophyceae
3.1.2 Phaeophyceae
3.1.3 Rhodophyceae
3.2 Bryophytes
3.2.1 Liverworts
3.2.2 Mosses
3.3 Pteridophytes
3.4 Gymnosperms
3.5 Angiosperms
3.6 Plant life cycles and alternation of generations

4: Animal Kingdom
Introduction
4.1 Basis of classification
4.1.1 Levels of organisation
4.1.2 Symmetry
4.1.3 Diploblastic and triploblastic organisation
4.1.4 Coelom
4.1.5 Segmentation
4.1.6 Notochord
4.2 Classification of animals
4.2.1 Phylum – Porifera
4.2.2 Phylum – Coelenterata(Cnidaria)
4.2.3 Phylum – Ctenophora
4.2.4 Phylum – Platyhelminthes
4.2.5 Phylum – Aschelminthes
4.2.6 Phylum – Annelida
4.2.7 Phylum – Arthropoda
4.2.8 Phylum – Mollusca
4.2.9 Phylum – Echinodermata
4.2.10 Phylum – Hemichordata
4.2.11 Phylum – Chordata
4.2.11.1 Class – Cyclostomata
4.2.11.2 Class – Chondrichthyes
4.2.11.3 Class – Osteichthyes
4.2.11.4 Class – Amphibia
4.2.11.5 Class – Reptilia
4.2.11.6 Class – Aves
4.2.11.7 Class – Mammalia

UNIT-II
Structural Organisation in Plants
and Animals

5: Morphology of Flowering Plants
Introduction
5.1 The root
5.1.1 Regions of the root
5.1.2 Modifications of root
5.2 The stem
5.2.1 Modifications of stem
5.3 The leaf
5.3.1 Venation
5.3.2 Types of leaves
5.3.3 Phyllotaxy
5.3.4 Modifications of leaves
5.4 The inflorescence
5.5 The flower
5.5.1 Parts of a flower
5.5.1.1 Calyx
5.5.1.2 Corolla
5.5.1.3 Androecium
5.5.1.4 Gynoecium
5.6 The fruit
5.7 The seed
5.7.1 Structure of a dicotyledonous seed
5.7.2 Structure of a monocotyledonous seed
5.8 Semi-technical description of a typical flowering plant
5.9 Descriptions of some important families
5.9.1 Fabaceae
5.9.2 Solanaceae
5.9.3 Liliaceae

6: Anatomy of Flowering Plants
Introduction
6.1 The tissues
6.1.1 Meristematic tissues
6.1.2 Permanent tissues
6.1.2.1 Simple tissues
6.1.2.2 Complex tissues
6.2 The tissue system
6.2.1 Epidermal tissue system
6.2.2 The ground tissue system
6.2.3 The vascular tissue system
6.3 Anatomy of dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plants
6.3.1 Dicotyledonous root
6.3.2 Monocotyledonous root
6.3.3 Dicotyledonous stem
6.3.4 Monocotyledonous stem
6.3.5 Dorsiventral (Dicotyledonous) leaf
6.3.6 Isobilateral (Monocotyledonous) leaf
6.4 Secondary growth
6.4.1 Vascular cambium
6.4.1.1 Formation of cambial ring
6.4.1.2 Activity of the cambial ring
6.4.1.3 Spring wood and autumn wood
6.4.1.4 Heartwood and sapwood
6.4.2 Cork cambium
6.4.3 Secondary growth in roots

7: Structural Organisation in Animals
Introduction
7.1 Animal tissues
7.1.1 Epithelial tissue
7.1.2 Connective tissue
7.1.3 Muscle
7.1.4 Neural tissue
7.2 Organ and organ system
7.3 Earthworm
7.3.1 Morphology
7.3.2 Anatomy
7.4 Cockroach
7.4.1 Morphology
7.4.2 Anatomy
7.5 Frogs
7.5.1 Morphology
7.5.2 Anatomy

UNIT-III
Cell: Structure and Functions

8: Cell: The Unit of Life
Introduction
8.1 What is a cell?
8.2 Cell theory
8.3 An overview of cell
8.4 Prokaryotic cells
8.4.1 Cell envelope and its modifications
8.4.2 Ribosomes and inclusion bodies
8.5 Eukaryotic cells
8.5.1 Cell membrane
8.5.2 Cell wall
8.5.3 Endomembrane system
8.5.3.1 The endoplasmic reticulum (ER)
8.5.3.2 Golgi apparatus
8.5.3.3 Lysosomes
8.5.3.4 Vacuoles
8.5.4 Mitochondria
8.5.5 Plastids
8.5.6 Ribosomes
8.5.7 Cytoskeleton
8.5.8 Cilia and flagella
8.5.9 Centrosome and centrioles
8.5.10 Nucleus
8.5.11 Microbodies

9: Biomolecules
Introduction
9.1 How to analyse chemical composition?
9.2 Primary and secondary metabolites
9.3 Biomacromolecules
9.4 Proteins
9.5 Polysaccharides
9.6 Nucleic acids
9.7 Structure of proteins
9.8 Nature of bond linking monomers in a polymer
9.9 Dynamic state of body constituents – concept of metabolism
9.10 Metabolic basis for living
9.11 The living state
9.12 Enzymes
9.12.1 Chemical reactions
9.12.2 How do enzymes bring about such high rates of chemical
conversions?
9.12.3 Nature of enzyme action
9.12.4 Factors affecting enzyme activity
9.12.5 Classification and nomenclature of enzymes
9.12.6 Cofactors

10: Cell Cycle and Cell Division
Introduction
10.1 Cell cycle
10.1.1 Phases of cell cycle
10.2 M phase
10.2.1 Prophase
10.2.2 Metaphase
10.2.3 Anaphase
10.2.4 Telophase
10.2.5 Cytokinesis
10.3 Significance of mitosis
10.4 Meiosis
10.4.1 Meiosis I
10.4.2 Meiosis II
10.5 Significance of meiosis

UNIT-IV
Plant Physiology

11: Transport in Plants
Introduction
11.1 Means of transport
11.1.1 Diffusion
11.1.2 Facilitated diffusion
11.1.2.1 Passive symports and antiports
11.1.3 Active transport
11.1.4 Comparison of different transport processes
11.2 Plant-water relations
11.2.1 Water potential
11.2.2 Osmosis
11.2.3 Plasmolysis
11.2.4 Imbibition
11.3 Long distance transport of water
11.3.1 How do plants absorb water
11.3.2 Water movement up a plant
11.3.2.1 Root pressure
11.3.2.2 Transpiration pull
11.4 Transpiration
11.4.1 Transpiration and photosynthesis – a compromise
11.5 Uptake and transport of mineral nutrients
11.5.1 Uptake of mineral ions
11.5.2 Translocation of mineral ions
11.6 Phloem transport: Flow from source to sink
11.6.1 The pressure flow or Mass flow hypothesis

12: Mineral Nutrition
Introduction
12.1 Methods to study the mineral requirements of plants
12.2 Essential mineral elements
12.2.1 Criteria for essentiality
12.2.2 Role of macro- and micro-nutrients
12.2.3 Deficiency symptoms of essential elements
12.2.4 Toxicity of micronutrients
12.3 Mechanism of absorption of elements
12.4 Translocation of solutes
12.5 Soil as reservoir of essential elements
12.6 Metabolism of nitrogen
12.6.1 Nitrogen cycle
12.6.2 Biological nitrogen fixation

13: Photosynthesis in Higher Plants
Introduction
13.1 What do we know?
13.2 Early experiments
13.3 Where does photosynthesis take place?
13.4 How many types of pigments are involved in photosynthesis?
13.5 What is a light reaction?
13.6 The electron transport
13.6.1 Splitting of water
13.6.2 Cyclic and non-cyclic photo-phosphorylation
13.6.3 Chemiosmotic hypothesis
13.7 Where are the ATP and NADPH used?
13.7.1 The primary acceptor of CO2
13.7.2 The Calvin cycle
13.8 The C4 pathway
13.9 Photorespiration
13.10 Factors affecting photosynthesis
13.10.1 Light
13.10.2 Carbon dioxide concentration
13.10.3 Temperature
13.10.4 Water

14: Respiration in Plants
Introduction
14.1 Do plants breathe?
14.2 Glycolysis
14.3 Fermentation
14.4 Aerobic respiration
14.4.1 Tricarboxylic acid cycle
14.4.2 Electron transport system (ETS) and oxidative phosphorylation
14.5 The respiratory balance sheet
14.6 Amphibolic pathway
14.7 Respiratory quotient

15: Plant Growth and Development
Introduction
15.1 Growth
15.1.1 Plant growth generally is indeterminate
15.1.2 Growth is measurable
15.1.3 Phases of growth
15.1.4 Growth rates
15.1.5 Conditions for growth
15.2 Differentiation, dedifferentiation and redifferentiation
15.3 Development
15.4 Plant growth regulators
15.4.1 Characteristics
15.4.2 The discovery of plant growth regulators
15.4.3 Physiological effects of plant growth regulators
15.4.3.1 Auxins
15.4.3.2 Gibberellins
15.4.3.3 Cytokinins
15.4.3.4 Ethylene
15.4.3.5 Abscisic acid
15.5 Photoperiodism
15.6 Vernalisation
15.7 Seed dormancy

UNIT-V
Human Physiology

16 : Digestions and Absorption
Introduction
16.1 Digestive system
16.1.1 Alimentary canal
16.1.2 Digestive glands
16.2 Digestion of food
16.3 Absorption of digested products
16.4 Disorders of digestive system

17: Breathing and Exchange of Gases
Introduction
17.1 Respiratory organs
17.1.1 Human respiratory system
17.2 Mechanism of breathing
17.2.1 Respiratory volumes and capacities
17.3 Exchange of gases
17.4 Transport of gases
17.4.1 Transport of oxygen
17.4.2 Transport of carbon dioxide
17.5 Regulation of respiration
17.6 Disorders of respiratory system

18: Body Fluids and Circulation
Introduction
18.1 Blood
18.1.1 Plasma
18.1.2 Formed elements
18.1.3 Blood groups
18.1.3.1 ABO grouping
18.1.3.2 Rh grouping
18.1.4 Coagulation of blood
18.2 Lymph (tissue fluid)
18.3 Circulatory pathways
18.3.1 Human circulatory system
18.3.2 Cardiac cycle
18.3.3 Electrocardiograph (ECG)
18.4 Double circulation
18.5 Regulation of cardiac activity
18.6 Disorders of circulatory system

19: Excretory Products and their Elimination
Introduction
19.1 Human excretory system
19.2 Urine formation
19.3 Function of the tubules
19.4 Mechanism of concentration of the filtrate
19.5 Regulation of kidney function
19.6 Micturition
19.7 Role of other organs in excretion
19.8 Disorders of the excretory system

20: Locomotion and Movement
Introduction
20.1 Types of movement
20.2 Muscle
20.2.1 Structure of contractile proteins
20.2.2 Mechanism of muscle contraction
20.3 Skeletal system
20.4 Joints
20.5 Disorders of muscular and skeletal system

21: Neural Control and Coordination
Introduction
21.1 Neural system
21.2 Human neural system
21.3 Neuron as structural and functional unit of neural system
21.3.1 Generation and conduction of nerve impulse
21.3.2 Transmission of impulses
21.4 Central neural system
21.4.1 Forebrain
21.4.2 Midbrain
21.4.3 Hindbrain
21.5 Reflex action and reflex arc
21.6 Sensory reception and processing
21.6.1 Eye
21.6.1.1 Parts of an eye
21.6.1.2 Mechanism of vision
10
21.6.2 The ear
21.6.2.1 Mechanism of hearing

22: Chemical Coordination and Integration
Introduction
22.1 Endocrine glands and hormones
22.2 Human endocrine system
22.2.1 The hypothalamus
22.2.2 The pituitary gland
22.2.3 The pineal gland
22.2.4 Thyroid gland
22.2.5 Parathyroid gland
22.2.6 Thymus
22.2.7 Adrenal gland
22.2.8 Pancreas
22.2.9 Testis
22.2.10 Ovary
22.3 Hormones of heart, kidney and gastrointestinal tract
22.4 Mechanism of hormone action

The syllabus for 1st PUC for the different subjects of the academic year 2021-22 is given below:

Serial Number Syllabus PDF link
1 Kannada
3 Sanskrit
4 Hindi
5 Urdu
5 English
3 Physics
4 Chemistry
5 Mathematics
6 Biology
7 Electronics
8 Computer Science

Practical/Experiments list & Model writeup

Physics Practical Examination Syllabus

  1. To measure the diameter of a small spherical/cylindrical body using Vernier Callipers.
  2. To measure the internal diameter and depth of a given beaker/calorimeter using Vernier Callipers and find its volume.
  3.  To measure the diameter of a given wire using a screw gauge. 
  4. To measure the thickness of a given sheet using a screw gauge. 
  5. To measure the volume of an irregular lamina using a screw gauge.
  6.  To determine the radius of curvature of a given spherical surface by a spherometer.
  7.  To determine the masses of two different objects using a beam balance.
  8.  To find the weight of a given body using the parallelogram law of vectors. 
  9.  Using a simple pendulum, plot L-T and L-T 2 graphs. Find the effective length of a seconds pendulum using an appropriate graph.
  10. To study the relationship between the force of limiting friction and normal reaction and to find the coefficient of friction between a block and a horizontal surface. 
  11.  To find the downward force, along an inclined plane, acting on a roller due to the Earth’s gravitational pull, and study its relationship with the angle of inclination (θ) by plotting a graph between force and sin θ.
  12.   To determine Young’s modulus of elasticity of the material of a given wire. 
  13.  To find the force constant of a helical spring by plotting a graph between load and extension. 
  14.  To study the variation in volume with pressure for a sample of air at constant temperature by plotting graphs between P and V and between P and 1/V. 
  15.  To determine the surface tension of water by capillary rise method. 
  16.  To determine the coefficient of viscosity of a given viscous liquid by measuring the terminal velocity of a given spherical body. 
  17.  To study the relationship between the temperature of a hot body and time by plotting a cooling curve. 
  18.  To determine the specific heat capacity of a given (i) solid (ii) liquid, by the method of mixtures. 
  19.  (i) To study the relation between frequency and length of a given wire under constant tension using a sonometer.
  20.  (ii) To study the relation between the length of a given wire and tension for constant frequency using a sonometer.
  21.   To find the speed of sound in air at room temperature using a resonance tube by two resonance positions. 

Physics Practical Examination Pattern:

The following link provides detailed information of the Physics practical examination, including the marks (split-up marks), duration, and steps. 

Chemistry Practical Examination Syllabus

1. Basic Laboratory Techniques 

  • Cutting glass tube and glass rod
  • Bending a glass tube
  • Drawing out a glass jet
  • Boring a cork 

2. Characterisation and Purification of Chemical Substance 

3. Determination of melting point of an organic compound.

4. Determination of boiling point of an organic compound. 

5. Crystallization involves an impure sample of any one of the following: aluminium, copper sulphate, and Benzoic acid.

Experiments Related to pH Change

Any one of the following experiments: 

  • Determination of pH of some solutions obtained from fruit juices, solutions of known and varied concentrations of acids, bases and salts using pH paper or universal indicator.
  • Comparing the pH of solutions of strong and weak acid of the same concentration.
  • Study the pH change in the titration of a strong acid with a strong base using a universal indicator. (b) Study of pH change by common-ion effect in case of weak acids and weak bases.


1. Chemical Equilibrium:

Any one of the following experiments:

(a) Study the shift in equilibrium between ferric ions and thiocyanate ions by increasing /decreasing the concentration of either of the ions. 

(b) Study the shift in equilibrium between [Co (H2O)6]2+and chloride ions by changing the concentration of either of the ions.

2. Quantitative Estimation Using a Chemical Balance

  • Preparation of standard solution of oxalic acid.
  • Determination of strength of a given solution of sodium hydroxide by titrating it against a standard solution of oxalic acid. 
  • Preparation of standard solution of sodium carbonate.  
  • Determination of strength of a given hydrochloric acid solution by titrating it against standard sodium carbonate solution.


3. Qualitative Analysis

(a) Determination of one anion and one cation in a given salt Cations – Pb2+, Cu2+,As3+,Al3+,Fe3+ Mn2+,Ni2+,Zn2+,Co2+,Ba2+,Mg2+,Sr2+Ca2+, NH4 + Anions CO3 2-, S2- ,SO3 2-, SO4 2-,NO22-, NO3 2- Cl-,Br-,I-,PO4 3-, C2O4 2-,CH3COO-, (Note : Insoluble salts excluded).

(b) Detection of nitrogen, sulphur, chlorine in organic compounds.

Chemistry Practical Examination Pattern

The link provided gives detailed information on the Chemistry practical examination, including marks (split-up marks), duration, and steps.

Biology Practical Examination Syllabus

Exercise-1: To study parts of a compound microscope.

Exercise-2: To identify and study the morphology of representative types of bacteria, fungi and different plant groups.

Exercise-3: To study some selected animals based on their external features.

Exercise-4: Study of tissues and diversity in shapes and sizes of plant cells.

Exercise-5: Preparation of herbarium sheets of flowering plants.

Exercise-6: Study of mitosis.

Exercise-7: To study modifications of the root.

Exercise-8: To study modifications of the stem.

Exercise-9: To study modifications of the leaf.

Exercise-9: To study the blastula stage of embryonic development in mammals, with the help of a permanent slide, chart, model or photograph.

Exercise-10: Preparation and study of mitosis in onion root tips.

Exercise-11: Study of stages of meiosis using permanent slides.

Exercise-12: Preparation and analysis of pedigree charts.

Exercise-13: Staining of nucleic acid by Acetocarmine.

Exercise-14: To identify common disease-causing organisms and the symptoms of the diseases.

Exercise-15: To study and identify different types of inflorescences.

Exercise-16: Study and describe flowering plants of families Solanaceae, Fabaceae and Liliaceae.

Exercise-17: To detect the presence of carbohydrates like glucose, sucrose and starch.

Exercise-18: To detect the presence of proteins.

Exercise-19: To detect the presence of fats(lipids) in plants and animal materials.

Exercise-20: Separation of plant pigments (chloroplast pigments) by paper chromatography.

Exercise-21: To study the rate of respiration in flower buds or germinating seeds.

Exercise-22: Observation and comment on the setup.

Biology Practical Examination Pattern:

The given link provides detailed information on the Biology practical examination, including marks (split-up marks), duration, and steps.

Computer Science Practical Examination Syllabus

List of practical programs for C++:

  • Write a program to interchange the values of two variables
    Using a third variable.
    Without using a third variable.
  • Write a program to find the area and circumference of a circle.
  • Write a program to find the area of a triangle given three sides.
  • Write a program to convert days into years, months and days (Hint: Assume all months have 30 days).
  • Write a program to find the largest, smallest and second-largest of three numbers using a simple if statement.
  • Write a program to input the total amount in a bill; if the amount is greater then 1000 a discount of 8% is given, otherwise no discount is given, output the total amount, the discount amount and the final amount, use simple if statement.
  • Write a program to check whether a given year is a leap year or not using an if-else statement.
  • Write a program to input a character and find out whether it is a lower case or upper case character using if-else statement.
  • Write a program to input the number of units of electricity consumed in a house and calculate the final amount using the nested-if statement. Use the following data for calculation:
Units Consumed Cost
< 30 ₹ 3.50 per unit
>=30 and <50 ₹ 4.25 per unit
>=50 and < 100 ₹ 5.25 per unit
>=100 ₹ 5.85 per unit

Write a program to input the marks of four subjects, calculate the total percentage and output the result as either “First class”, or “Second class”, or “Pass class” or “Fails” using switch statements.

Class Range %
First Class Between 60 and 100%
Second Class Between 50 and 59%
Pass Between 40 and 49%
Fail Less than 40%
  • Write a program to find the sum of all the digits of a number using while statement.
  • Write a program to input principal amount, rate of interest and period, and calculate compound interest using while statement. (Hint: CI=P(1+R100)T ).
  • Write a program to check whether a given number is a power of 2.
  • Write a program to check whether a given number is an Armstrong number using a do-while statement (Hint: 153 = 13 + 53+ 33).
  • Write a program to find the factorial of a number using for statement.
  • Write a program to generate the Fibonacci sequence up to a limit using for statement.
  • Write a program to find the sum and average of “N” numbers.
  • Write a program to find the second largest of “N” numbers.
  • Write a program to arrange a list of numbers in ascending order.
  • Write a program to find the position of a given number in an array.
  • Write a program to check whether a given matrix is scalar or not.
  • Write a program to sum all the rows and the sum of all the columns of a matrix separately.
  • Write a program to find the sum of two compatible matrices.
  • Consider an array MARKS[20][5] which stores the marks obtained by 20 students in 5 subjects. Now write a program to:
  • Find the average marks obtained in each subject
  • Find the average marks obtained by every student
  • Find the number of students who have scored below 50 in their Average
  • Write a program to check whether a given string is a palindrome or not.
  • Write a program to count the number of vowels and consonants in a string.
  • Write a program to find the GCD and LCM of two numbers using functions.
  • Write a program to find XY using functions.
  • An industrial organization wants to computerize the Allowance calculations.


Given the monthly Sales for the salesman, the rules for the calculations are as follows:

i. If the total sales is less than Rs. 10000/- there is no allowance.

ii. If the total sales are between Rs. 10000/- and Rs. 20,000/- then the Allowance is 10% of the sales amount or Rs. 1800/- whichever is minimum.

iii. If the total sales are greater than or equal to Rs. 20000/- then the allowance is 20% of the sales amount or Rs.6,000/- whichever is minimum.

  • Write a program using a function to calculate the allowance.
  • Write a program to input the register number, name and class of all the students in a class into a structure and output the data in a tabular manner with proper heading.


Section B

Spreadsheet Practical List

1. Eight salesmen sell three products a week. Using a spreadsheet create a sales report. The report should include the salesman’s name, the number of sales for each product and the salesman’s total sales in the format.

  • Type in all text and numbers in the spreadsheet.
  • Format all numbers as a currency.
  • Center the spreadsheet headings across the spreadsheet.
  • Format all text.
  • Create formulas to display a total for each sales rep.
  • Create formulas to display a total for each product.
  • Create a formula to calculate the total sales for all sales representatives for the month.


2. Enter the following details for 10 employees Employee Code, Employee name, Basic salary, DA, HRA, Loans, Total salary and Tax.

Salary for the Month

1. Type the Employee Code, Employee Name, Basic Salary and Loan amount data for 10 employees in the spreadsheet.

  • Format all numbers as a currency.
  • Center the spreadsheet headings across the spreadsheet.
  • Format all text.
  • Create a formula to compute DA as 50% of the Basic salary and copy this to all the cells.
  • Create a formula to compute HRA as 12% of the Basic salary and copy this to all the cells.
  • Create a formula to compute Total salary and copy this to all the cells.
  • If the Total salary is greater than 5,00,000, compute Tax as 20% of Total salary; otherwise, 10% of the Total salary using a formula


2. Enter the following details for 10 Students Register Number, Name, Subject Marks, Subject2 Marks, Subject3 Marks, Subject4 Marks, Total Marks and Percentage.

  • Type the Register Number, Name and Marks of four subjects for 10 students in the spreadsheet.
  • Format all text and numeric data appropriately.
  • Center the spreadsheet headings across the spreadsheet.
  • Create a formula to compute the Total marks and copy this to all the cells.
  • Create a formula to compute Percentage and copy this to all the cells.
  • Create a formula to compute the highest and lowest score using a library function.
  • Draw a bar graph for Register Number against total marks.
  • Draw Pie chart for one student showing his marks in different subjects from the total score


3. A housewife maintains the budget expenditure in a spreadsheet under the headings Income and Expenses. Income includes husband’s and Wife’s income separately under different headings. Expenses include Rent, Bills, Household expenses and medical expenses.

  • Type the Income and Expenses data for the entire month in the spreadsheet.
  • Format all numbers as currency.
  • Center the spreadsheet headings across the spreadsheet.
  • Create a formula to compute the Total expenditure and copy this to all the cells.
  • Create a formula to compute the savings and copy this to all the cells.
  • Draw a bar graph to show expenditure under each heading.
  • Draw Pie chart to show the distribution of salary.


4. A bank offers loans for housing and vehicle at an interest of 10.25% for housing and 14.2% for vehicles. Applicants compute the monthly premium (EMI) for a loan, given total instalments as 24 months. Also, compute the monthly interest, and monthly principal amount and the total amount of principal and Interest paid using Financial library functions in a spreadsheet.

5. Implement five functions each for Arithmetic, Date and Time, Financial, Logical, text and statistical functions. Write the syntax, example and output for simple problems.

6. Create a data form to implement a student database and perform all related operations with the data form.

Section C

Web Designing Practical List

  1. Create a web page to display your details using different tags.
  2. Create a model website for your college using different tags.

Computer Science Practical Examination Pattern:

The given link provides detailed information on the Computer Science practical examination, including marks (split-up marks), duration, and steps.

Electronics Practical Examination Pattern:

Electronics Practical Examination Pattern

Click on the links given below to view and download the PDF files that contain details such as syllabus, weightage, and blueprints of the individual subjects.

Subject Syllabus PDF link
Physics Physics
Chemistry Chemistry
Mathematics Mathematics
Biology Biology
Computer Science Computer Science
Electronics Electronics

Study Plan to Maximise Score

Study Plan to Maximise Score

Detailed Study plan

While we are busy studying for our examinations, we can combine our efforts into something more efficient and effective by paying attention to a few key aspects listed below.

  • Have a positive attitude: This is something we hear a lot, and for good reason. If we are discouraged and tense, no preparation will be beneficial. Keep your cool and trust yourself to make the best use of the time you have.
  • Make a study schedule: Planning your studies around your schedule and requirements offers clear benefits. Micromanagement should be avoided because it might be unproductive. Have a broad but clear idea of what you should do and how it will assist you in achieving your objective.
  • Eat a balanced diet: At this moment, your brain requires proper nutrition to function properly. It’s critical to have your mental faculties on your side at this point.
  • Refer to previous years question papers: Previous years’ papers will give you an approximate idea of the syllabus covered, questions and their types, etc.
  • Identify your strong and weak points: Make a list of your strong and weak subjects, as well as the parts of each subject that are strong and weak. After that, compare it to the pattern of the question paper to see how it will affect you. If your weak sections are important, you’ll need to modify your plan. Knowing this will help you in the future.
  • Have a good sleep: It is essential to have proper sleep before the examination in order to recall what you have studied. Don’t miss the opportunity to practise writing a paper if you have the time! It teaches you how and where to manage your time and increases your recall, among many other things.
  • Drink plenty of water: Toxins can easily be flushed from your body. By drinking plenty of water, you can keep your body hydrated.
  • Stay calm during the exam: If you get stuck on a difficult question, don’t get discouraged; instead, move on to the next one and don’t make any conclusions about your performance.
  • Move on: Your main concern after an exam is to prepare for the next one. Never ever waste your time at any point in the discussion of a bad paper.  With this meaningless exercise, you stand to gain nothing.

Exam Counselling

Exam counselling

Student Counselling

  1. At all times, students should have a goal plan in place. The abbreviations for SMART goals are S-Specific, M-Measurable, A-Achievable, R-Realistic or Relevant, and T-Timebound.
  2. If students are receiving poor grades, they should never give up.
  3. Some subjects will appear straightforward, while others will appear difficult. Always plan an entertaining schedule that includes both easy and tough topics, as well as some time for fun.
  4. Start your day with some meditation, yoga, and exercise.
  5. The first rule of good study habits is to keep yourself active and healthy.
  6. Take responsibility for your mistakes, learn from them, and try not to repeat them.
  7. Share your concerns with your teachers and parents.
  8. Never place yourself in a situation where you have to judge yourself against others. Every single person is unique.
  9. Continue to study new things and broaden your mind throughout your life.
  10. Take part in some after-school activities.
  11. Always remember, “Tough times don’t last, but tough people do.” Be determined.

Parent/Gaurdian counselling

The trend of parents living their ambitions through their children has an impact on many careers. Parents are frequently observed imposing their decisions on their children rather than allowing them to pursue their own desires. Parents should consider their children’s education, interests, aspirations, and passions. People can obtain happiness when they are encouraged to do something they enjoy. Secondary school is a key phase in deciding on a career path. Mistakes made may also have a long-term impact on students. According to studies, 95% of students choose streams without even knowing what they are.

Even professionally, parents play an important part in their children’s growth and development. They have a better understanding of their child’s potential. Here is a list of activities that parents and students can conduct together to choose an appropriate career path:

  • Make a list of the classes that your child will enjoy and that will help them advance in their careers.
  • Assist them in deciding which of the courses on the list they want to pursue as a profession.
  • Make a list of the best universities for each course they’re interested in.
  • Gather information on the admission requirements and eligibility criteria for these courses.
  • Gather both online and offline study materials for the course.
  • Seek expert career advice from a trusted source.

Important Dates

About Exam

Result Date

Karnataka state board Class 11 results will (tentatively) be declared in the month of April 2022.

 

Application Process

About Exam

Dos and Donts of Form Filling

The website provided below will provide detailed information on the admission fee, process, and guidelines, among many other things.

Admission Guidelines

For detailed information on the admission fee, process, and guidelines click here.

Exam Result

Exam Result

Result Declaration

Karnataka state board Class 11 results will (tentatively) be declared in the month of April 2022.

FAQs

Freaquently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Q1. Who should get the Eligibility Certificate to get admission to the 11th Karnataka State Board?
A. A student who has passed an equivalent examination to S.S.L.C. of Karnataka from any other country other than India must obtain an Eligibility Certificate. A student who has passed an equivalent examination to SSLC of Karnataka from other state boards/CBSE/ICSE/IGCSE/NIOS etc., from other states within India must also obtain an Eligibility Certificate. 

Q2. What is the 11th and 12th PUC?
A. The Pre-University Course or Pre-Degree Course (PUC or PDC) is a two-year intermediate course (also known as 10+2) that relates to Class 11 and 12 and is known as 1st PUC and 2nd PUC in PU Colleges or Junior Colleges. It is conducted by state education institutions or boards.

Q3. Does the Karnataka State Board follow the NCERT syllabus?
A. Yes, the Karnataka state board follows the NCERT syllabus. 

Q4. Who should get the Eligibility Certificate?
A. Eligibility should be sought by:

  • A student seeking admission to first year PUC. 
  • A student who has passed an equivalent examination to S.S.L.C. of Karnataka from any country other than India must obtain an eligibility certificate.
  • A student who has passed an equivalent examination to SSLC of Karnataka from other state boards/CBSE/ICSE/IGCSE/NIOS etc., from other states within India.
  • Also, students seeking admission to second year PUC. A student who has passed the 11th or equivalent examination from other state boards/other countries need to get the eligibility certificate from the head office. 

Q5. What are the criteria for passing Karnataka Board PUC?
A. To pass the PUC exam, students must score at least 35 per cent. To be declared as a pass, candidates must obtain a minimum of 70 marks in the language papers and 30 marks in each of the individual subjects for a total of 210 marks out of 600 marks.

Q6. What will happen if a college admits students without eligibility certificates?
A. Students without an eligibility certificate will not be permitted to continue their education and take exams. The concerned Principal will be solely held responsible for this. Suitable action will be initiated against the Principal. 

Q7. Who will issue the eligibility certificate? 
A. a. For students who come from other countries, the Department of Pre-University Education Bangalore will issue the eligibility certificate 
b. For students who have passed an equivalent examination to S.S.L.C from other state boards/CBSE/ICSE from other states, the PU college’s concerned Principal will issue the provisional Eligibility Certificate. They need not approach the head office for this. 

Q8. When will the Karnataka SSLC exam 2022 be conducted?
A. The Karnataka SSLC 2022 will be held from March 28 to April 11, 2022.

Q9. When will the Social Science exam be conducted for Class 10 Boards?
A. The Social Science exam is scheduled for April 6, 2022.

 Q10. What documents should be submitted to get the eligibility certificate?
 A. The following documents should be submitted.

  • An attested photocopy of Class 10 or 11 or equivalent marks card.
  • Attested copy of the T.C. Issued by the last attended institution.
  • Attested a copy of the Migration Certificate.
  • Passport documents in case NRI and other Foreign of Students. 
  • Visa in case of international students.
  • Original challan for having paid the fees.
  • Self-addressed stamped envelope.

Dos and Donts

Q1. Who should get the Eligibility Certificate to get admission to the 11th Karnataka State Board?
A. A student who has passed an equivalent examination to S.S.L.C. of Karnataka from any other country other than India must obtain an Eligibility Certificate. A student who has passed an equivalent examination to SSLC of Karnataka from other state boards/CBSE/ICSE/IGCSE/NIOS etc., from other states within India must also obtain an Eligibility Certificate. 

Q2. What is the 11th and 12th PUC?
A. The Pre-University Course or Pre-Degree Course (PUC or PDC) is a two-year intermediate course (also known as 10+2) that relates to Class 11 and 12 and is known as 1st PUC and 2nd PUC in PU Colleges or Junior Colleges. It is conducted by state education institutions or boards.

Q3. Does the Karnataka State Board follow the NCERT syllabus?
A. Yes, the Karnataka state board follows the NCERT syllabus. 

Q4. Who should get the Eligibility Certificate?
A. Eligibility should be sought by:

  • A student seeking admission to first year PUC. 
  • A student who has passed an equivalent examination to S.S.L.C. of Karnataka from any country other than India must obtain an eligibility certificate.
  • A student who has passed an equivalent examination to SSLC of Karnataka from other state boards/CBSE/ICSE/IGCSE/NIOS etc., from other states within India.
  • Also, students seeking admission to second year PUC. A student who has passed the 11th or equivalent examination from other state boards/other countries need to get the eligibility certificate from the head office. 

Q5. What are the criteria for passing Karnataka Board PUC?
A. To pass the PUC exam, students must score at least 35 per cent. To be declared as a pass, candidates must obtain a minimum of 70 marks in the language papers and 30 marks in each of the individual subjects for a total of 210 marks out of 600 marks.

Q6. What will happen if a college admits students without eligibility certificates?
A. Students without an eligibility certificate will not be permitted to continue their education and take exams. The concerned Principal will be solely held responsible for this. Suitable action will be initiated against the Principal. 

Q7. Who will issue the eligibility certificate? 
A. a. For students who come from other countries, the Department of Pre-University Education Bangalore will issue the eligibility certificate 
b. For students who have passed an equivalent examination to S.S.L.C from other state boards/CBSE/ICSE from other states, the PU college’s concerned Principal will issue the provisional Eligibility Certificate. They need not approach the head office for this. 

Q8. When will the Karnataka SSLC exam 2022 be conducted?
A. The Karnataka SSLC 2022 will be held from March 28 to April 11, 2022.

Q9. When will the Social Science exam be conducted for Class 10 Boards?
A. The Social Science exam is scheduled for April 6, 2022.

 Q10. What documents should be submitted to get the eligibility certificate?
 A. The following documents should be submitted.

  • An attested photocopy of Class 10 or 11 or equivalent marks card.
  • Attested copy of the T.C. Issued by the last attended institution.
  • Attested a copy of the Migration Certificate.
  • Passport documents in case NRI and other Foreign of Students. 
  • Visa in case of international students.
  • Original challan for having paid the fees.
  • Self-addressed stamped envelope.

List of Educational Institutions

About Exam

List of Schools

The following table contains a list of relevant colleges in various districts of Karnataka. Click on the links to access the list of colleges in each district.

No. District Name (Colleges list) No. District Name (Colleges list)
1 Bangalore North 17 Yadgir
2 Bangalore South 18 Hassan
3 Bangalore Rural 19 Chikkaballapur
4 Ramanagar 20 Kolar
5 Bellary 21 Chamarajanagar
6 Belgaum 22 Mysore
7 Bagalkot 23 Mandya
8 Bijapur 24 Uttara Kannada
9 Bidar 25 Koppal
10 Davangere 26 Raichur
11 Chitradurga 27 Dakshina Kannada
12 Chikmagalur 28 Dakshina Kannada
13 Gadag 29 Udupi
14 Haveri 30 Tumkur
15 Dharwad 31 Kodagu
16 Gulbarga 32 Chikkodi

This district-wise list of colleges can also be accessed on the official link by clicking on District-wise List of Colleges in Karnataka.

Counselling

About Exam

Parent Counselling

The trend of parents living their ambitions through their children has an impact on many careers. Parents are frequently observed imposing their decisions on their children rather than allowing them to pursue their own desires. Parents should consider their children’s education, interests, aspirations, and passions. People can obtain happiness when they are encouraged to do something they enjoy. Secondary school is a key phase in deciding on a career path. Mistakes made at this stage may also have a long-term impact on students. According to studies, 95% of students choose streams without even knowing what they are. So, it becomes the guardian’s job to guide the students well.

Here is a list of activities that parents and students can conduct together to choose an appropriate career path:

  • Make a list of the classes that your child will enjoy and that will help them advance in their careers.
  • Assist them in deciding which of the courses on the list they want to pursue as a profession.
  • Make a list of the best universities for each course they’re interested in.
  • Gather information on the admission requirements and eligibility criteria for these courses.
  • Gather both online and offline study materials for the course.
  • Seek expert career advice from a trusted source.

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