Human Respiratory System - Detailed Explanation
  • Written By Sumana_C
  • Last Modified 19-07-2022
  • Written By Sumana_C
  • Last Modified 19-07-2022

Human Respiratory System – Detailed Explanation

Human Respiratory System: Students preparing for the NEET and Biology-related exams must have an idea about the human respiratory system. It is a network of tissues and organs that help us to breathe. Human organs can work because the respiratory system helps our body to absorb oxygen from the air. Along with that, this particular system cleans waste gases like carbon dioxide from our blood. If this system doesn’t work properly, many problems can occur, including diseases, infections, and allergies.

What is Human Respiratory System?

It has already been defined that the human respiratory system is a network of tissues and organs that help us to breathe. This particular system includes airways, blood vessels, and lungs. While the muscle power of the lungs is a part of the respiratory system, our body gets oxygen throughout, and the waste gases like carbon dioxide get cleaned from our body just because of this system.

What does Human Respiratory System do?

The human respiratory system has many functions. Apart from contributing to breathing in and breathing out, or inhaling or exhaling, the human respiratory system functions are given below.

  • The human respiratory system allows us to smell and talk.
  • This particular system warms the air to match our body temperature. On the other hand, it moisturizes it to the humidity level that our body demands.
  • Each cell of our body gets oxygen because of this system.
  • While exhaling, waste gases get removed like carbon dioxide because of this respiratory system.
  • Our airways are protected from harmful substances and irritants because of the human respiratory system.

What Constitutes the Respiratory System’s Components?

Numerous components of the human respiratory system work together to support breathing. Each set of parts is made up of numerous individual parts.

Our lungs receive air from our airways. Our intricate system of airways includes the following.

Mouth and Nose: The openings in our mouth and nose allow air to enter the respiratory system in our body.

Sinuses: Holes in our skull that assist control the humidity and temperature of the air we breathe in.

Pharynx (throat): Air is delivered to the trachea through the pharynx, a tube in the throat (windpipe).

Trachea: The passageway that joins our throat to our lungs is known as the trachea.

Bronchial Tubes: The tubes that connect to each lung at the base of our windpipe are called bronchial tubes.

Lungs: Two organs called lungs take oxygen from the air and transfer it to our blood.

All our organs and other tissues receive oxygen through our bloodstream from our lungs.

Muscles and bones help move the air we inhale and exhale. Some of the bones and muscles in the human respiratory system include the following.

Diaphragm: The diaphragm is a muscle that aids in breathing in and breathing out.

Ribs: Bones that encircle and shield our heart and lungs.

Our blood removes carbon dioxide and other waste from the body when we exhale. Other elements that interact with blood arteries and the lungs include:

Alveoli: In the lungs, these little air sacs are where carbon dioxide and oxygen are exchanged.

Bronchioles: Small bronchial tube branches that connect to the alveoli are known as bronchioles.

Capillaries: Alveolar walls contain blood vessels called capillaries that transport carbon dioxide and oxygen.

Lung Lobes: Lung lobes are the lungs’ sections, with two lobes in the left lung and three in the right.

Pleura: Each lung lobe is surrounded by a thin sac called a pleura, which separates your lungs from your chest wall.

Additional Human Respiratory System Parts

The following are a few of the additional respiratory system parts:

Cilia: Tiny hairs that move in a wave-like pattern to clear our airways of dust and other irritants are known as cilia.

Epiglottis: The epiglottis is a tissue flap that closes as we swallow to keep food and liquids out of our airways. It is located near the entrance of the trachea.

Larynx (Voice Box): A hollow organ that produces sounds as air enters and exits the body. 

How are the Respiratory Systems Affected by Conditions?

The tissues and organs that make up the respiratory system are susceptible to a wide range of diseases. Some develop as a result of airborne irritants you breathe in, such as infectious viruses or bacteria. Others come about as a result of illness or aging.

The following conditions may result in respiratory system inflammation (swelling, irritation, and pain) or other respiratory system effects:

Allergies: Some people develop respiratory allergies as a result of inhaling proteins from dust, mold, and pollen. Our airways may become inflamed as a result of these proteins.

Asthma: A chronic (long-lasting) illness, asthma results in airway inflammation, which can make breathing challenging.

Infection: Infections can cause bronchitis or pneumonia, an inflammation of the lungs (inflammation of the bronchial tubes). The flu (influenza) or a cold are frequent respiratory infections.

Disease: Lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are respiratory illnesses (COPD). These conditions can impair the respiratory system’s capacity to filter waste gases and distribute oxygen throughout the body.

Aging: As you age, your lung capacity declines.

Breathing issues can result from respiratory system damage.

Infection: Infections can cause bronchitis or pneumonia, an inflammation of the lungs (inflammation of the bronchial tubes). The flu (influenza) or a cold are frequent respiratory infections.

Disease: Lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are respiratory illnesses (COPD). These conditions can impair the respiratory system’s capacity to filter waste gases and distribute oxygen throughout the body.

Aging: As we age, our lung capacity declines.

Breathing issues can result from respiratory system damage.

When Should We Consult a Medical Professional if Experiencing Respiratory Problems?

If we experience pain or difficulty breathing, we must speak to a doctor. The doctor will examine the heartbeat, lungs, and chest while listening to them for any indications of a respiratory problem, such as an infection. The healthcare professional may use imaging tests like a CT scan or MRI to determine whether your respiratory system is functioning as it should. These tests provide the doctor the ability to spot blockages or swelling in the lungs and other parts of our respiratory system. Spirometry is a component of pulmonary function testing, which our doctor may also advise. An instrument called a spirometer might measure how much air one inhales and exhales. To help prevent major respiratory disorders and lung disease, visit a doctor for routine exams. These problems can be prevented from getting worse by early diagnosis.

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